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The Odd Disappearance of Daniel Barter

2020.09.25 20:58 Deathbringspasta The Odd Disappearance of Daniel Barter

To begin this story, we need to jump back in time to the year 1959, in Perdido Bay, Alabama. The date was June 18th, 1959, and the Barter family who lived in the 1700 block of Thrush Drive in the nearby city of Mobile, Alabama, were enjoying a camping trip in the Perdido Bay area. This trip consisted of Daniel Barter, his mother Maxine Barter, 3 of his 6 siblings, and one of his cousins. His other 3 siblings were staying with some relatives. This campsite was not much more than an hour from their home in Mobile.
Sometime between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m., While Daniel’s parents were preparing their fishing equipment for the day, Daniel would wander off from the rest of his family. At the time, he was carrying a bottle of Nehi soda around with him. Maxine Barter did not seem to notice Daniel’s absence until about 10 to 15 minutes later. She began searching for her son but could not locate him or any sign of him anywhere. Not long after this, authorities were called in and began a full search of the immediate area.
Now, what concerns me the most is the area Daniel went missing in. Being from the state of Florida, I have grown up in swampy areas my entire life. I even used to swim in them from time to time, stupid of me I know. Swampy areas not only hold many dangerous critters, but they have endless nooks and crannies for someone to fall into and never be heard from again. This specific swampy area in the Perdido Bay area is highly infested with alligators. The possibility of Daniel being attacked by one of these animals is unfortunately rather high. So much so that officials caught 2 alligators and cut them open, but to no avail.
Multiple groups of civilian volunteers came together to search the area, walking shoulder to shoulder in groups of 25. They did this in a 5-mile radius of the area and combed it extensively, looking for any sign of Daniel. This massive group peaked at around 2,000 people, including 300 members of the local US Navy and military bases and over 150 law enforcement officers and firemen from Alabama, Florida, and other close states.
Bloodhounds and other scent dogs were brought in to search the area as well as Jeeps, helicopters, horses, and more, but again nothing would be found. Not even the Nehi soda bottle was ever found. Somehow, this 4-year-old boy simply vanished into thin air, never to be seen again. Divers searched from the top of the bay down into the swampy areas, finding nothing once again.
The bottom of the lake was dragged, and sinkholes and thickets were searched thoroughly. Authorities hoped that in doing this they may jar out a body that could be stuck on the bottom. Dynamite was even tossed in areas he may have fallen as well. This sounds a bit extreme to me, but I guess I would not be the authority on that.
According to Daniel’s mother, Maxine Barter, Daniel did not like the water, and she does not think he would have gone into the bay by himself. The bay was exceptionally shallow at that time of day, you could walk a considerable distance without getting all that wet. The brush around the family’s campsite was very thick and prickly. Daniel was only wearing a pair of shorts at the time with no shoes. The Barter family does not believe he would have gone into the bushes either.
After over a week of tirelessly searching the area turned up little to nothing, officials decided it was unlikely Daniel walked into the water or woods around them on his own. This was one of the most intensive searches ever conducted in Baldwin County history. Authorities began to investigate the likelihood of this being an abduction. They were never able to find any clues or evidence supporting this theory though. The Barter family was not a wealthy one and they never received any sort of ransom note or message. Making a motive of ransom unlikely.
Things would only grow to be stranger from here on out though. According to Daniel’s mother, roughly a month or so before Daniel would disappear, she claims to have seen a mysterious unknown vehicle parked in front of their house. Maxine would allegedly approach the car and attempt to confront the driver. She said a man was driving and he immediately covered his face with a newspaper and drove off. To make this claim a bit more valid, a neighbor of the Barter family claims they saw a man acting strangely and peering into the window of the room Daniel and his brothers slept in. The neighbor would mention this to Maxine, and they investigated the place the man had been standing. The man, of course, was gone but he had left footprints in the dirt under the window.
They would call the police who came and photographed the footprints and took casts of them. Since this was nearly 60 years ago, it is unclear if this evidence even exists anymore. I do want to mention, that even though this case is old, there is still a chance we can help progress it. While I do not have the highest hopes that justice will be brought here, I do still think it is unbelievably valuable to keep the memory and story of Daniel Barter going. If only as a cautionary tale for parents out there. The last thing I would like to mention in the timeline of strange happenings is that on the morning of Daniel’s disappearance, Maxine drove him and one of his brothers to the store. She parked and went inside, leaving the boys in the car. While she was gone, an unknown man drove up next to the Barter’s car and stared at the boys for an uncomfortable amount of time. Then the man suddenly drove away without speaking a word to them. Daniel’s brother would tell Maxine about this encounter when she returned to the car.
Due to this odd sequence of events, the Barters heavily suspect that someone had been stalking the family for some time, with intentions to abduct Daniel. Unfortunately, the case would go cold and would fall inactive until just recently. Nearly 50 years after Daniel disappeared his case was reopened in 2008. That was 12 years ago, and we are still in desperate need of help to bring justice to Daniel. Many of the original case files have been lost or destroyed in the last 6 decades. Making this that much harder to piece together. I have seen cases with less info be solved recently though, so I do have faith that Daniel Barter may have his day of justice.
I have found several theories online and in articles as to what happened to Daniel. I will briefly touch on a few of these theories. The main theory is of course that Daniel was abducted by an unknown suspect. Due to the timeline shared by the family, this is the strongest belief. A second theory and one of the early theories of this case is that Daniel accidentally drowned in the Perdido Bay. Even though the family heavily refutes this as he did not like the water. But the tides were incredibly low and easy enough for a toddler to walk a fair distance without getting very wet at all. The third theory is that Daniel may have gotten lost while walking around the area of the campsite. Since the brush was so thick, it would not be impossible that Daniel got turned around and became lost. But, since the area was searched so thoroughly, this is unlikely. The fourth and final theory I will be touching on is the idea that Daniel may have been attacked and possibly eaten by an alligator. Now, this is a bit extreme but, in an area, with several alligators, this is not unfathomable. Multiple large gators were hunted in the area and gutted, but no evidence of human remains was found.
Sadly, Daniel’s father died in 1965 and his mother followed in 1995. Both never knowing what truly happened to their son. All the siblings that were alive during the disappearance are still alive and that he is still out there and hope the case will be resolved one day. In 2009, the family returned to the campsite to remember their missing brother and dedicated a half-century mission to find him.
Daniel Barter went missing from the Perdido Bay, Alabama area on June 18th, 1959. He was just four years of age at the time and was last seen wearing grey boxer shorts and carrying a bottle of Nehi soda. He was 3 feet tall and weighed 50 pounds at the time of his disappearance. His hair his brown and so are his eyes, he has scars on his fingers and one on his tongue. His case is currently labeled as a non-family abduction and if he is still alive, he would be 64 years old. If you or anyone you may know have any information on this case, please send in your tips to Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office, 251-972-8589. You can always remain anonymous.
submitted by Deathbringspasta to WithoutATrace [link] [comments]


2020.09.24 20:35 marcusfjohnson Finally making the switch from xbox to PC this year. first time building a PC, help me save money and not mess it up.

What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.
What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?
When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.
What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc)
Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?
If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.
Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?
Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)
Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?
Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?
** heres what i got so far on my own, feel free to scrap everything and show me something better though, im partial to the GPU, and Monitor, and intel for the CPU unless you can convince me that that is stupid PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-10700K 3.8 GHz 8-Core Processor $382.82 @ B&H
CPU Cooler EVGA CLC 280 113.5 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $121.00 @ Walmart
Motherboard MSI MAG Z490 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1200 Motherboard $189.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory $168.98 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $104.99 @ Adorama
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks Eclipse P400A Digital ATX Mid Tower Case -
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $139.93 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $108.78 @ Other World Computing
Case Fan Corsair ML120 Pro 75 CFM 120 mm Fan $27.99 @ Corsair
Monitor LG 34GK950F-B 34.0" 3440x1440 144 Hz Monitor $899.99 @ Amazon
Custom 3080 $700.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2899.46
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-09-24 14:33 EDT-0400
submitted by marcusfjohnson to buildapcforme [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:36 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to tupelo [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:36 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to Natchez [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:36 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to Meridian [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:36 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to jacksonms [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:36 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to hattiesburg [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:36 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to Biloxi [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 16:35 flyinmacaronimonster A Guide to Voting in the General Election in Mississippi, and an Important Note about Restricted Absentee Voting

IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR ANYBODY WHO DOES NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE IN MISSISSIPPI. YOU MUST VOTE IN-PERSON, AT YOUR LOCAL PRECINCT ON ELECTION DAY. THERE IS NO EARLY VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI, SO YOU WILL HAVE TO VOTE ON ELECTION DAY. Please see the ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON and ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL sections down below.
Because Mississippi Election law is rather complex, there are 6 side notes that I have listed below, that I feel are important to note:
SIDE NOTE #1: WHILE "IN-PERSON ABSENTEE" VOTING BEGINS TODAY, IT IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH A VALID EXCUSE.
SIDE NOTE #2: Unlike all other 49 states and DC, being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 due to a pre-existing condition is actually not technically a minimum valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi. Explanation and recommendations on what to do listed down below in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section.
SIDE NOTE #3: If you qualify to vote-by-mail (see list in the ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL section below), you must realize that you have to:
(a) have your application (NOT ballot, but application) notarized (b) have (1) witness sign the ballot itself (c) you have to mail it back, as hand-delivery of absentee ballots is illegal and strictly prohibited in the State of Mississippi
SIDE NOTE #4: IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU EITHER VOTE IN-PERSON ON ELECTION DAY OR BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING YOUR BALLOT. Mississippi currently provides NO NOTIFICATION OR CURE PROCESS for mismatched signatures, so, if your signature doesn't match the one on your ballot APPLICATION (NOT voter registration, but ballot application), you should assume that it will be rejected outright, without your knowledge. (See page 22 and 23 of the County Election Handbook in the list of links at the bottom of the page.)
SIDE NOTE #5: if you are voting in-person on Election Day or absentee (VALID EXCUSE ONLY), you will need to provide a form of valid photo identification. YOUR PHOTO ID NEEDS TO BE CURRENT AS OF NOVEMBER 3, 2010, AS YOUR ID CANNOT BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION. A list of valid identification can be found here:
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
SIDE NOTE #6: If you have ever been convicted of one of the (22) crimes listed below, then you permanently lose your right to vote in the State of Mississippi:
  1. Arson
  2. Armed Robbery
  3. Bigamy (defined by the Mississippi State Code of Laws as such: "Every person having a husband or wife living, who shall marry again, and every unmarried person who shall knowingly marry the husband or wife of another living, except in the cases hereinafter named, shall be guilty of bigamy.")
  4. Bribery
  5. Embezzlement
  6. Extortion
  7. Felony Bad Check
  8. Felony Shoplifting
  9. Forgery
  10. Larceny
  11. Murder
  12. Obtaining Money or Goods under False Pretenses
  13. Perjury
  14. Rape
  15. Receiving Stolen Property
  16. Robbery
  17. Theft
  18. Timber Larceny
  19. Unlawful Taking of Motor Vehicle
  20. Statutory Rape
  21. Carjacking
  22. Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement
I am adding this because Mississippi is one of three states (including Alabama and Tennessee) to unilaterally disenfranchise any person convicted of certain crimes of moral turpitude. What defines a "Crime of Moral Turpitude" in Mississippi, as well as Alabama and Tennessee, is rather broad in nature, and, generally speaking, not all of these crimes would normally be seen as especially severe or heinous in nature (for example: bigamy, shoplifting, bad check writing, and timber larceny [out of all things]).
For transparency, it is best to be clear about the specific crimes would disenfranchise you, so that, if you happen to be convicted of one of the crimes mentioned above, you would at least know that you do not have the right to vote in Mississippi.
VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are not registered to vote yet, please register to vote right now. Mississippi does not have online voter registration, so, if you have not registered to vote yet, you can register to vote in-person or by mail. The deadline for voter registration is Monday, October 5. A directory of County Clerk's offices can be found below.
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx
For all registered voters who have a valid excuse to vote absentee, absentee voting, both in-person and by-mail, begins today, Monday, September 21.
ABSENTEE VOTING IN-PERSON:
If you are voting in-person absentee, you would go to your County Circuit Clerk's office and vote there. A directory of circuit clerk's offices can be found in the list of links at the bottom of the page. NOTE: IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A VALID EXCUSE TO VOTE ABSENTEE IN-PERSON, YOU MAY NOT VOTE ABSENTEE-IN-PERSON.
List of excuses:
  1. Any qualified elector who is a bona fide student, teacher or administrator at any college, university, junior college, high, junior high, or elementary grade school whose studies or employment at such institution necessitates his or her absence from the county of his or her voting residence on the date of any primary, general or special election, or the spouse and dependents of that student, teacher or administrator if such spouse or dependent(s) maintain a common domicile, outside of the county of his or her voting residence, with such student, teacher or administrator.
  2. Any qualified elector who is required to be away from his or her place of residence on any election day due to his or her employment as an employee of a member of the Mississippi congressional delegation and the spouse and dependents of such person if he or she shall be residing with such absentee voter away from the county of the spouse’s voting residence.
  3. Any qualified elector who is away from his or her county of residence on election day for any reason.
  4. Any person who has a temporary or permanent physical disability and who, because of such disability, is unable to vote in person without substantial hardship to himself, herself or others, or whose attendance at the voting place could reasonably cause danger to himself, herself or others. For purposes of this paragraph (d), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  5. The parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent physical disability who is hospitalized outside of his or her county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles distant from his or her residence, if the parent, spouse or dependent will be with such person on election day. For purposes of this paragraph (e), “temporary physical disability” shall include any qualified elector who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 during the year 2020 or is caring for a dependent who is under a physician-imposed quarantine due to COVID-19 beginning with the effective date of this act and the same being repealed on December 31, 2020.
  6. Any person who is sixty-five (65) years of age or older.
  7. Any member of the Mississippi congressional delegation absent from Mississippi on election day, and the spouse and dependents of such member of the congressional delegation.
  8. Any qualified elector who will be unable to vote in person because he or she is required to be at work on election day during the times at which the polls will be open.
ABSENTEE VOTING-BY-MAIL
You may vote absentee-by mail ONLY if you are:
  1. Temporarily residing outside the county;
  2. Temporarily or permanently physically disabled;
  3. Sixty-five (65) years of age or older; or,
  4. The parents, spouses, or dependents of temporarily or permanently physically disabled persons who are hospitalized outside of their counties of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residences if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
WHEN YOU APPLY FOR YOUR ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE APPLICATION MUST BE NOTARIZED. YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE THE BALLOT ITSELF NOTARIZED, JUST SIGNED BY A WITNESS
(from the step-by-step guide to absentee voting [link at the bottom of the page]):
IMPORTANT NOTE: Being at a higher-than-normal risk for COVID-19 is actually not technically a valid excuse to vote absentee in Mississippi, as it is (at a minimum) in all other 49 states and DC. The reasoning is that having a pre-existing condition that makes puts you at a higher-than-normal risk does not automatically qualify as a temporary disability.
However, if you feel as if your life would be put in acute danger if exposed to COVID-19, I would not necessarily discourage you from applying for an absentee ballot-by-mail anyway. If you want to apply for an absentee ballot to be sent to you by mail, that is a judgement call for you to make.
If you have already requested an absentee ballot it should be sent to you soon. Once it arrivesREAD THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY, fill in your ballot, SIGN YOUR NAME IN THE CORRECT PLACE, and MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BALLOT IS SIGNED BY A WITNESS.
REMEMBER, AGAIN, IF YOU HAVE AN INCONSISTENT OR BAD SIGNATURE, IT WILL BE REJECTED WITHOUT NOTICE, SO BE CAREFUL WHEN SIGNING IT.
ONCE YOU ARE DONE YOU WILL NEED MAIL BACK YOUR BALLOT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is illegal to hand-deliver an absentee ballot in Mississippi (Page 12 of the County Election Handbook; link at the bottom of the page). Ballots need to be post-marked by Election Day, and received by Tuesday, November 10. As a side note, Mississippi is one of two states (Mississippi and Tennessee) that requires ALL ballots that are mailed to also be mailed back.
I do not know what will happen if you vote in-person after requesting an absentee ballot, but you will likely have to sign an affidavit before voting.
LINKS TO SOURCES:
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/pages/voter-registration-information.aspx [INFORMATION ON VOTER REGISTRATION]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Pages/County-Election-Info.aspx [COUNTY ELECTION INFORMATION DIRECTORY]
https://msvoterid.ms.gov/Pages/VoterIDAcceptID.htm [MISSISSIPPI PHOTO ID]
https://www.msvoterid.ms.gov/forms/FAQ%20Voter%20ID.pdf [PHOTO ID FAQ; ALSO CAN BE EXPIRED NO MORE THAN 10 YEARS BEFORE ELECTION DAY]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Elections-Voting/Documents/SummaryofAttorneyGeneralOpinionsonElectionIssues.pdf [LIST OF DISENFRANCHISING CRIMES]
https://advance.lexis.com/documentpage/?pdmfid=1000516&crid=ba8fa06c-cbe7-4ccb-8e46-f56fcbd42651&nodeid=ABYAAPAABAAH&nodepath=%2FROOT%2FABY%2FABYAAP%2FABYAAPAAB%2FABYAAPAABAAH&level=4&haschildren=&populated=false&title=%C2%A7+97-29-13.+Bigamy%3B+definition%3B+penalty.&config=00JABhZDIzMTViZS04NjcxLTQ1MDItOTllOS03MDg0ZTQxYzU4ZTQKAFBvZENhdGFsb2f8inKxYiqNVSihJeNKRlUp&pddocfullpath=%2Fshared%2Fdocument%2Fstatutes-legislation%2Furn%3AcontentItem%3A8P6B-8B52-8T6X-73VD-00008-00&ecomp=c38_kkk&prid=7a73e1ca-a62e-4027-85b2-ab2ddede4408 [Legal Definition of Bigamy (#3), as defined by Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-13 in the Mississippi Code of laws]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx
https://www.sos.ms.gov/elections-voting/documents/voterinformationguide.pdf
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/Elections/Mississippi%20%20County%20Election%20Handbook.pdf [COUNTY ELECTION HANDBOOK; GOOD SOURCE FOR DETAILED VOTING RULES IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.sos.ms.gov/content/documents/elections/Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Absentee%20Voting_forweb.pdf [STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ABSENTEE VOTING IN MISSISSIPPI]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/07/17/heres-how-mississippi-plans-run-its-election-during-pandemic/5358060002/ [POSTMARK AND RECEIPT DATE]
https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/09/18/mississippi-justices-no-broad-absentee-voting-during-covid/ [COVID-19 NOT AN EXCUSE]
https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/election/article244807637.html [article about absentee voting]
https://www.wlox.com/2020/08/18/mississippi-voters-must-qualify-vote-absentee-upcoming-presidential-election/ [another article about absentee voting]
https://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/politics/2020/09/11/voting-absentee-mississippi-guide-2020-election/5748443002/ [ballots sent out September 21]
https://www.wapt.com/article/absentee-voting-begins-monday-in-mississippi/34061653#
https://www.democracydocket.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/41/2020/07/Safeguarding-Our-Democracy-with-Vote-by-Mail_DemocracyDocket_UPDATED_JULY2020.pdf [signature mismatch]
https://campaignlegal.org/update/signature-matching-and-absentee-ballots-safeguards-ensure-every-vote-counts
submitted by flyinmacaronimonster to mississippi [link] [comments]


2020.09.20 11:37 th2f Anyone able to source more information on this Jane Doe or missing person?

So, this seems like a potential match simply based on age, location + date.
Here is a summary of similarities before getting into the actual request for information:
Annie Sullivan (MP) Jane Doe (UP)
Date missing/found April 24, 1991 February 19, 1998 - est. post mortem interval is (unspecified) years
Location missing/found Bessemer, Alabama Bessemer, Alabama
Location missing/found 2 Home, surrounded by woods 25m from Shades Creek in overgrown brush (wooded area)
Age 85 60 - 100
Height 5'0" - 5'2" est. 5'2"
Annie Sullivan was reported missing from her home in Bessemer, Alabama, in 1991. A friend came over to take Annie to a doctor however was met with an empty house. While blood spatter was found in the house, the scene did not seem to indicate a struggle according to police. There was a cigarette found in the house although Annie didn't smoke. Annie's dentures were also left behind. The woods around her house were searched by volunteers however nothing came of this.

Jane Doe was found in Bessmer, Alabama, in 1998. She is reported as having been deceased for "years". There is no mention of dentures nor missing teeth. I am assuming that this is something that almost definitely would have been mentioned.


So, I can't seem to find any additional information online re Annie Sullivan or the Jane Doe. I was wondering if anyone else might have more luck?
A few of the things I'm most curious about/feel would be most telling are:

submitted by th2f to gratefuldoe [link] [comments]


2020.09.18 06:24 Reactionaryhistorian I came across a paper written after Lee’s surrender. It indicates that even at this date some in the Confederacy were still holding out hope for victory. It seems incredibly badly informed. How well were southerners informed about the war’s progress? When did they realize they had lost?

This question was prompted by my finding this rather astonishing issue whilst reading through old Civil War newspapers online (as you do when you have no life). It's from the Chattanooga Daily Rebel which, as its name suggests, is very pro-confederate.
This article was published April 25 1865 and discusses what it calls the recent armistice between the two sides. The writer seems to be under the impression that the result of this armistice will likely be the independence of the Confederacy. He insists that it was asked for by the Union generals. He doesn't seem to believe that Lee has surrendered and he talks about the "flight at Petersburg" being "very disastrous to the enemy". The article also mentions the possibilty of the USA having to withdraw its troops in order to prevent revolution at home following the assassination of Lincoln.
Later reading aroung I found this article from The Tri-Weekly News in South Carolina. The Independence of the South-Is There a Cause fo Despondency. Wrtten in the aftermath of Lee's surrender it argues that France is about to intervene of behalf of the South in order to preserve Emperor Maximilian since the "grasping ambition of the Yankees" will leed them to conquer Mexico if they are pemitted to take over the South. This is, it believes, why the North has asked for a armistice (once again the writer seems to seriously belive that the armistice amounts to a victory for the South and has been agreed to from a position of Northern weakness). Just how seriously could people have taken such hopes?
Just how typical are these papers of attitudes in the south at this late date? Are they simply a case of an isolated refusals to see reality or were these sorts of attitudes and optimism common in the south?
submitted by Reactionaryhistorian to AskHistorians [link] [comments]


2020.09.17 01:55 ugotknockedthefckout ALABAMA: November 16th...write it down.

edit NOVEMBER 16TH HAS BEEN CONFIRMED BY MULTIPLE SOURCES by the Alabama State Department of Health, the Pharamacy Director etc. to be the date that the new Alabama fast track federal ruling will take effect. There will 45 day window starting October 1st (the date the ruling is published) where someone can file a legislative disagreement hearing. If none is filed then the ruling takes effect Novemeber 16th.
I only want everyone to know about these dates and the urgency so you can protect and prepare yourselves. Much love.
edit 9/21 Is anyone in Alabama out there?! I wish someone with ACTUAL political and government knowledge would speak up and actually talk about this to help us understand so we aren't blind sided.
The more i read on this type of rule change, the more im understanding that citizens have no say and can't file a disagreement. The filing is only for legislative politicians to contest the fact that they voted on it in as "rapid rule change" instead of going through normal channels to pass it. So basically our hands are tied COMPLETELY. it's CRAZY that we have no say in this outside of what politicians we vote into office. Cheers
This is most likely the date the new law will go into effect if there is no petition and disagreement filed. This is when vendors will no longer ship to Alabama and Tia will be off shelves.
If anyone in Alabama wants to an online petition and find out how to file a disagreement and contest the bill....or if anyone has more info, PLEASE speak up!
submitted by ugotknockedthefckout to Tianeptine [link] [comments]


2020.09.15 22:53 _mr0 test

Alabama Oct. 19th https://www.sos.alabama.gov/alabama-votes/voteregister-to-vote Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://www.sos.alabama.gov/alabama-votes/absentee-ballot-applications County Absentee Election Manager's Office Received Nov. 2nd https://myinfo.alabamavotes.gov/VoterView/AbsenteeBallotSearch.do For absentee ballots, check "I have a physical illness or infirmity which prevents my attendance at the polls". All voters may request absentee for this year only.
Alaska Oct. 4th https://www.elections.alaska.gov/Core/voterregistration.php Oct 19th - Nov 2nd https://www.elections.alaska.gov/Core/AIPEVEvents.php https://elections.alaska.gov/Core/AKVoteEarly.php Absentee voting location Postmarked Nov. 3rd https://myvoterinformation.alaska.gov/
Arizona Oct. 5th https://azsos.gov/elections/voting-election/register-vote-or-update-your-current-voter-information Oct 7th - Oct 30th https://my.arizona.vote/PortalList.aspx same - sign up for PEVL when registering Dropbox (locations are on County Recorder's site) Received Nov. 3rd https://my.arizona.vote/AbsenteeTracker.aspx
Arkansas Oct. 5th https://www.sos.arkansas.gov/elections/voter-information/voter-registration-information Oct 19th - Nov 2nd County clerk's office; see website for other locations https://www.sos.arkansas.gov/uploads/elections/Absentee_Ballot_Application_1.pdf County Clerk's office Received Nov. 2nd https://www.voterview.ar-nova.org/voterview
California Oct. 20th https://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-registration/ Oct 5th - Nov 2nd https://caearlyvoting.sos.ca.gov/ same - check "yes" for voting by mail when registering Dropbox Postmarked Nov. 3rd and received November 20th https://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/ballot-status/wheres-my-ballot/
Colorado Nov. 3rd (Oct. 26th for VBM) https://www.sos.state.co.us/votepages/pub/home.xhtml Doesn't have early In Person n/a All-mail election See County Clerk and Recorder's site Received Nov. 3rd https://www.sos.state.co.us/votepages/pub/olvfindVoterReg.xhtml
Connecticut Oct. 29th https://portal.ct.gov/SOTS/Election-Services/Voter-Information/Voter-Registration-Information Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://portal.ct.gov/SOTS/Election-Services/Voter-Information/Absentee-Voting Town Clerk's office Received Nov. 3rd https://portaldir.ct.gov/sots/LookUp.aspx
Delaware Oct. 3rd https://elections.delaware.gov/votevotereg.shtml Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://elections.delaware.gov/services/voteabsentee/citizen.shtml Department of Elections office Received Nov. 3rd https://ivote.de.gov/VoterView Delaware will mail absentee applications to all residents. If you need to complete the online form, choose Reason #3 "I am sick..." as your reason
Florida Oct. 5th https://registertovoteflorida.gov/ Oct 19th - Nov 1st (varies by county; must offer at least one week Oct. 24th-31st) See your Supervisor of Elections' website https://dos.myflorida.com/elections/for-voters/voting/vote-by-mail/ Any early voting location during early voting, or dropbox on Election Day (see County Supervisor's office) Received Nov. 3rd https://registration.elections.myflorida.com/CheckVoterStatus
Georgia Oct. 5th https://sos.ga.gov/index.php/Elections/register_to_vote Oct 12th - Oct 30th https://www.mvp.sos.ga.gov/MVP/mvp.do https://ballotrequest.sos.ga.gov/ County registrar's office or a dropbox (see their website for location info) Received Nov. 3rd https://www.mvp.sos.ga.gov/MVP/mvp.do
Hawaii Oct. 5th or Oct 20 through Nov 3 in-person at a voting service center https://elections.hawaii.gov/frequently-asked-questions/voter-registration/ Oct 20th - Nov 2nd Any voter service center in your county https://elections.hawaii.gov/hawaii-votes-by-mail/ (All-mail in 2020) Any voter service center or place of deposit Received Nov. 3rd https://ballotstatus.hawaii.gov/Default Hawaii will automatically mail ballots to all registered voters - keep address up to date
Idaho Oct. 21st https://idahovotes.gov/ Oct 19th - Oct 30th See county clerk's website https://elections.sos.idaho.gov/ElectionLink/ElectionLink/AbsenteeSearch.aspx County Clerk's office Received Nov 3rd https://idahovotes.gov/
Illinois Oct. 18th online or Oct 19 through Nov 3 in person at a grace period location https://ova.elections.il.gov/ Sept 24th - Nov 2nd https://www.elections.il.gov/VotingAndRegistrationSystems/EarlyVotingLocationsSearch.aspx https://elections.il.gov/electionoperations/VotingByMail.aspx County Election Authority's office, or a dropbox (see their site for locations) Postmarked Nov. 3rd Done separately by counties
Indiana Oct. 5th http://www.indianavoters.com/ Oct 6th - Nov 2nd County Elections Administrator's office; possibly others (see their website) Same County Election Administrator's office Received Nov. 3rd at noon https://indianavoters.in.gov/
Iowa Oct. 24th online or at Auditor's office through Nov. 3rd https://sos.iowa.gov/elections/voterinformation/voterregistration.html Oct 5th - Nov 2nd County Auditor's office https://sos.iowa.gov/elections/electioninfo/absenteemail.html County Auditor's office Postmarked Nov. 2nd AND received Nov. 9th https://sos.iowa.gov/elections/absenteeballotstatus/absentee/search))
Kansas Oct. 13th https://www.kdor.ks.gov/apps/voterreg/default.aspx Oct 14th - Nov 2nd See County elections officer's website https://www.sos.ks.gov/forms/elections/AV1.pdf County elections officer's office, or a dropbox (see site for locations) Postmarked Nov. 3rd and received Nov. 6th https://myvoteinfo.voteks.org/voterview/
Kentucky Oct. 5th https://elect.ky.gov/registertovote/Pages/default.aspx Oct 13th - Nov 2nd See County Clerk's website https://vrsws.sos.ky.gov/abrweb/ County Clerk's office - website may have dropbox locations Received Nov 3rd https://vrsws.sos.ky.gov/ovrweb/govoteky All voters will be allowed to vote by mail in KY this year.
Louisiana Oct. 5th / Oct. 14th online https://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/RegisterToVote/Pages/default.aspx Oct 20th - Oct 27th (Excluding the 25th) https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/earlyvoting https://www.sos.la.gov/OurOffice/PublishedDocuments/COVID-19%20VR2%20Absentee%20by%20Mail%20Application%20(Rev.%204-20)%20Ver.%201.pdf%20Ver.%201.pdf) Parish Registrar of voters' office Received Nov. 2nd https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/ Must be high-risk for COVID-related illness, under quarantine, experiencing symptoms, or caring for someone high-risk to qualify for a COVID-based absentee ballot
Maine Oct. 13th online, up to Nov. 3rd in person https://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/elec/voter-info/voterguide.html Oct 5th - Oct 29th Town office or City Hall https://www.maine.gov/cgi-bin/online/AbsenteeBallot/index.pl Clerk's office Received Nov 3rd https://www.maine.gov/cgi-bin/online/AbsenteeBallot/ballot-status.pl
Maryland Oct. 13th, Same day Reg https://elections.maryland.gov/voter_registration/index.html Oct 26th - Nov 2nd https://elections.maryland.gov/voting/early_voting.html https://voterservices.elections.maryland.gov/OnlineVoterRegistration/InstructionsStep1 Any early voting or Election Day voting center, polling place, drop box, or your Local Board of Elections. See their website for locations Postmarked Nov 3rd https://voterservices.elections.maryland.gov/VoterSearch
Massachusetts Oct. 24th https://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/eleifv/howreg.htm Oct 23rd - Oct 30th https://www.sec.state.ma.us/earlyvotingweb/earlyvotingsearch.aspx http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/eleev/early-voting-by-mail.htm Local Election Office or dropbox Postmarked Nov 3rd https://www.sec.state.ma.us/wheredoivotema/track/trackmyballot.aspx
Michigan Oct. 19th online, up to Nov. 3rd in person at City Hall https://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,1607,7-127-1633_8716_8726_47669-175878--,00.html Sept 19th - Nov 2nd Clerk's office https://mvic.sos.state.mi.us/avapplication Clerk's office or dropbox Received Nov. 3rd https://mvic.sos.state.mi.us/VoteIndex Dropbox locations - may change
Minnesota Oct. 13th, same day Reg during early and Election Day voting http://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/register-to-vote/ Sept 18th - Nov 2nd County elections office; possibly other locations - see website https://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/other-ways-to-vote/vote-early-by-mail/ County elections office (may include dropbox locations) Postmarked Nov. 3rd https://mnvotes.sos.state.mn.us/AbsenteeBallotStatus.aspx
Mississippi Oct. 5th https://www.sos.ms.gov/Vote/Pages/default.aspx Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://www.ms.gov/sos/voter_registration/documents/voter_registration_application.pdf Clerk's office Received Oct. 31st in person, Nov. 2nd by mail https://www.msegov.com/sos/voter_registration/AmIRegistered MS has no special provisions to allow absentee voting during COVID.
Missouri Oct. 7th https://s1.sos.mo.gov/elections/goVoteMissouri/register.aspx Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://www.sos.mo.gov/elections/goVoteMissouri/howtovote#Mail Local Elections Authority (ABSENTEE BALLOTS ONLY - Mail ballots must be sent through the mail) Received Nov. 3rd https://s1.sos.mo.gov/elections/voterlookup/ Most mail-in and absentee ballots in MO must be notarized - can be done free at these locations
Montana Oct. 26th, or up to Nov. 3rd atdesignated locations https://sosmt.gov/elections/vote/ Oct 4th - Nov 1st Elections Administrator's office Same Elections Administrator Received Nov. 2nd at noon https://app.mt.gov/voterinfo/
Nebraska Oct. 16th https://www.nebraska.gov/apps-sos-voter-registration/ Oct 4th - Nov 2nd County Elections Office https://sos.nebraska.gov/elections/voter-forms County Elections Official Received Nov. 3rd https://www.votercheck.necvr.ne.gov/voterview
Nevada Oct. 29th online, or same day at polls https://www.nvsos.gov/sosvoterservices/Registration/Step0.aspx Oct 17th - Oct 30th See County Clerk's site https://www.nvsos.gov/sos/elections/voters/absentee-voting (All-mail in 2020) Drop-off location (locations are on County Clerk's site), or Clerk's office Postmarked Nov 3rd and received Nov 10th https://www.nvsos.gov/votersearch/ Nevada just passed a law to mail a ballot to all voters, but this may be challenged in court.
New Hampshire Nov. 3rd https://sos.nh.gov/HowRegVote.aspx Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://sos.nh.gov/media/rs0ly4xu/absentee-ballot-app-8-20-covid.pdf Clerk's office Received Nov 3rd https://app.sos.nh.gov/Public/AbsenteeBallot.aspx
New Jersey October 13th https://www.state.nj.us/state/elections/voter-registration.shtml Doesn't have early In Person n/a Same - check box on registration form County Board of Elections Postmarked Nov. 3rd and received November 10th (exec. order) https://voter.svrs.nj.gov/auth/sign-in
New Mexico Oct. 6th https://www.sos.state.nm.us/voting-and-elections/voter-information-portal/voter-registration-information/ Oct 17th - Oct 31st See County Clerk's site https://www.sos.state.nm.us/voting-and-elections/voting-faqs/absentee-voting-by-mail/ County Clerk's office or Voter Convenience Center (see clerk's website for locations Received Nov. 3rd https://voterportal.servis.sos.state.nm.us/WhereToVote.aspx?tab=AbsenteeTracker If the absentee ballot tracker doesn't work, check with your County Clerk
New York Oct. 9th https://dmv.ny.gov/more-info/electronic-voter-registration-application Oct 24th - Nov 1st https://www.voteearlyny.org/ https://www.elections.ny.gov/votingabsentee.html County Board of Elections, or any early voting or Election Day polling place Postmarked Nov. 3rd and received Nov. 10th https://voterlookup.elections.ny.gov/
North Carolina Oct. 9th (or during early voting) https://www.ncsbe.gov/Voters/Registering-to-Vote Oct 15th - Oct 31st https://vt.ncsbe.gov/OSSite https://www.ncsbe.gov/Voting-Options/Absentee-Voting County Board of Elections or any early voting site (during early voting) Postmarked Nov 3rd, received Nov 6th Upcoming (by Sep 1) Online absentee ballot request and tracking portals upcoming (Sep 1)
North Dakota No voter registration n/a Oct 19th - Nov 2nd https://vip.sos.nd.gov/PortalListDetails.aspx?ptlhPKID=50&ptlPKID=7#content-start https://vip.sos.nd.gov/PortalListDetails.aspx?ptlhPKID=53&ptlPKID=7 County Auditor's office Received Nov. 2nd https://vip.sos.nd.gov/AbsenteeTracker.aspx
Ohio Oct. 5th https://olvr.ohiosos.gov/ Oct 6th - Nov 1st County Board of Elections (except Lucas and Summit counties - see site for info https://www.ohiosos.gov/publications/#abr Local Board of Elections Postmarked Nov. 2nd and received Nov. 13th https://www.sos.state.oh.us/elections/voters/toolkit/ballot-tracking/
Oklahoma Oct. 9th https://www.ok.gov/elections/Voter_Info/Register_to_Vote/index.html Oct 29th - Oct 30th. County Election Board https://www.ok.gov/elections/Voter_Info/Absentee_Voting/ County Election Board Received Nov. 2nd https://www.ok.gov/elections/OVP.html
Oregon Oct. 13th https://sos.oregon.gov/voting/Pages/registration.aspx?lang=en Doesn't have early In Person n/a All-mail election Drop box Received Nov. 3rd https://sos.oregon.gov/voting/pages/myvote.aspx?lang=en
Pennsylvania Oct. 19th https://www.votespa.com/Register-to-Vote/Pages/How-to-Register-to-Vote.aspx Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/OnlineAbsenteeApplication/#/OnlineAbsenteeBegin County Board of Elections Received Nov. 3rd https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/pages/ballottracking.aspx
Rhode Island Oct. 4th https://vote.sos.ri.gov/Home/RegistertoVote?ActiveFlag=1 Oct. 14th - Nov. 2nd Local Board of Canvassers' office https://vote.sos.ri.gov/VoteVotebyMail?ActiveFlag=4 Local Board of Canvassers Received Nov. 3rd https://vote.sos.ri.gov/
South Carolina Oct. 5th https://www.scvotes.gov/south-carolina-voter-registration-information Doesn't have early In Person n/a https://info.scvotes.sc.gov/eng/voterinquiry/VoterInformationRequest.aspx?PageMode=AbsenteeRequest Local Elections Office Received Nov. 3rd https://info.scvotes.sc.gov/eng/voterinquiry/VoterInformationRequest.aspx?PageMode=AbsenteeInfo Absentees may not be allowed for the general election - they were for the primary.
South Dakota Oct. 19th https://sdsos.gov/elections-voting/voting/register-to-vote/default.aspx Sept 18th - Nov 2nd County Auditor's office https://sdsos.gov/elections-voting/voting/absentee-voting.aspx County Auditor's office Received Nov. 2nd https://vip.sdsos.gov/viplogin.aspx
Tennessee Oct. 5th https://ovr.govote.tn.gov/ Oct 14th - Oct 29th See Local Election Commission's office https://sos.tn.gov/products/elections/absentee-voting n/a - must be submitted by mail. In-person delivery is specifically not allowed. Received Nov. 3rd https://sos.tn.gov/products/elections/voter-registration-information-lookup-absentee-mail-ballot-status-tracker
Texas Oct. 5th https://www.votetexas.gov/register-to-vote/index.html Oct 13th - Oct 30th https://teamrv-mvp.sos.texas.gov/MVP/mvp.do https://www.sos.texas.gov/elections/votereqabbm.shtml Early voting clerk Received Nov. 3rd https://webservices.sos.state.tx.us/FPCA/index.aspx Not all voters are eligible for mail-in ballots in Texas
Utah Oct. 23rd https://secure.utah.gov/voterreg/index.html Oct 20th - Oct 30th https://votesearch.utah.gov/voter-search/search/search-by-address/how-and-where-can-i-vote Same - check box on registration form Dropbox Received Nov. 3rd https://votesearch.utah.gov/voter-search/search/search-by-votetrack-mail-ballot
Vermont Nov. 3rd https://sos.vermont.gov/elections/voters/registration/ Sept 19th - Nov 2nd Town Clerk's office https://sos.vermont.gov/elections/voters/voter-faqs/absentee-voting-faqs/#q1 Town Clerk's office Received Nov. 2nd https://mvp.vermont.gov/ All voters will be sent a mail-in ballot for November
Virginia Oct. 13th https://vote.elections.virginia.gov/VoterInformation Sept 19th - Oct 31st https://vote.elections.virginia.gov/voterinformation/publiccontactlookup Same Local registrar's office Postmarked Nov. 3rd and received Nov. 6th https://vote.elections.virginia.gov/VoterInformation
Washington October 26th online; November 3rd in person https://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/register.aspx Oct 16th - Nov 3rd https://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/auditors/# All-mail election Many locations - see County Auditor's website Postmarked Nov. 3rd https://voter.votewa.gov/WhereToVote.aspx Washington will mail ballots. Make sure your address is up to date.
Washington D.C. Oct. 13th online. Nov 3rd in person https://www.dcboe.org/FAQS/Voter-Registration Oct 24th - Nov 3rd https://earlyvoting.dcboe.org/ https://www.dcboe.org/Voters/Absentee-Voting/Request-an-Absentee-Ballot Drop box Recieved Nov 3rd https://www.dcboe.org/Voters/Absentee-Voting/Track-Absentee-Ballot
West Virginia Oct. 13th https://ovr.sos.wv.gov/RegisteLanding Oct 21st - Oct 31st Contact clerk for more information https://sos.wv.gov/elections/Pages/AbsenteeVotingInformation.aspx Clerk's office Recieved Nov 4th https://services.sos.wv.gov/Elections/VoteAbsenteeBallotTracking
Wisconsin Oct. 13th online; can register in person at clerk's office until October 30th, and on Election Day at the polls. https://myvote.wi.gov/en-US/RegisterToVote Oct 20th - Nov 1st Municipal clerk's office https://myvote.wi.gov/en-US/VoteAbsentee Municipal clerk's office or dropbox (see their website for locations) Recieved Nov 3rd https://myvote.wi.gov/en-us/MyVoterInfo
Wyoming October 20th https://sos.wyo.gov/Elections/State/RegisteringToVote.aspx Sept 18th - Nov 2nd County clerk's office https://sos.wyo.gov/Elections/State/AbsenteeVoting.aspx County clerk's office Recieved Nov 2nd Contact your County Clerk
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2020.09.14 18:35 CFB_Referee Hurricane Sally

Sally remains a hurricane and is moving slowly.

From the latest public advisory (as of 9/16 11:30 AM ET) Sally is likely to cause issues with rainfall, storm surge, surf, wind tornados, and flooding - including potential inland flooding.
Check your local weather or emergency management agency for more specific information where you are.
 
Please look to local news, local weather, and local and state emergency management agencies to find out more about how you may be affected, if you need to evacuate, and steps on getting prepared. Please everyone stay safe.
 
U Forecasts, Predictions, and Watches/Warnings
 
Tulsa Preparedness & Planning
College students should check out their university's emergency alert system - if you're not signed up to get notices, you should!
Useful links on: hurricane preparedness, emergency kits, emergency supplies for your car.
 
Louisburg Other things worth thinking about or getting:
  • General: A cooler. Fun/mental health stuff - books, games, etc. Cash. Weather radio and batteries. Flashlights > candles. Backup cell phone, laptop, or other batteries. Extra water. Hand sanitizer. Comfort items (a toddler's blankie, the puppy's favorite toy, your grandpa's watch you can't imagine losing).
  • Specialized: Transportation and assistive devices (think especially about children, pets, the elderly, people with disabilities).
  • Cars: Gas. Window breakeseatbelt cutter.
 
Gattaca Florida Safety:
  • Check your smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector batteries!
  • Watch out for downed power lines. Never assume it is dead. Avoid it.
  • Assume floodwaters are deeper than they look. Turn around, don't drown.
  • Learn your flood and evacuation zones!
  • Food safety from the FDA and USDA.
  • If your home floods and you need to go up, head for the roof. Keep an ax in your attic to get out that way if you need it.
  • Be aware of potential 911 delays.
  • Evacuate! If you can, check on people you know to see if they need help evacuating if you can offer it or put them in touch with someone who can.
 
Hertfordshire Documentation:
  • Bring it with you.
  • Store it in a plastic bag to they are together and stay dry.
  • House deed/rental agreement/lease.
  • Insurance information (home, car, renters, medical, flood).
  • Identification (ID card/driver's license, passport, Social Security card, marriage/birth certificates).
  • Take photographs of your home before you evacuate and when you return. Good documentation of the damage may help if you need to file an aid or insurance claim.
 
For long-term preparedness, check out CERT training information.
 
Holland Evacuation
College Information
We'll be updating this list as we get information.
 
/CFB Ball Alabama
University Update Sources
Bishop State Community College All remote learning on Monday and Tuesday. All events cancelled Monday and Tuesday. 7
Coastal Alabama Community College Closses at 2 PM on Monday. In person classes closed through Wendesday. Online classes continue to meet. 5
Spring Hill College Classes cancelled after 1:30 PM on Monday. Classes online on Tuesday. 5
University of Mobile Move to all online instruction as of 1:30 PM Monday. Normal classes resume Wendesday. 5
South Alabama University of South Alabama Classes, events, and activities canceled Tuesday and Wednesday. 16
 
/CFB Ball Florida
University Update Sources
Gulf Coast State College All campuses closed Tuesday. 11
Northwest Florida State College Closed through Tuesday. 13
Pensacola State College All campuses closed Monday and Tuesday. 7, 17
West Florida University of West Florida All classes - in person and online - cancelled through Thursday. 18
 
/CFB Ball Louisiana
University Update Sources
Delgado Community College Online classes only on Monday and Tuesday. 8, 19
Loyola Operating normally until 4 PM on Monday. Classes canceled Tuesday. Classes resume Wednesday. 2, 20
New Orleans Theological Seminary/Leavell College Closed Monday-Wednesday. 8
Nicholls Nicholls State All classes online Monday-Wednesday. 4
Northshore Technical Community College Online on Monday. Closed on Tuesday. Decision on Wednesday pending. 8, 21
Nunez College Online classes continue. In person classes cancelled Monday and Tuesday. 8
Southeastern Louisiana Southeastern University All classes online on Monday. All classes cancelled on Tuesday. 14
Southern Southern University Normal operations on Tuesday. 9, 22
Tulane Tulane In person and online classes canceled after noon on Monday and Tuesday. Wednesday classes TBD. 1
Holy Cross University of Holy Cross Closed Monday and Tuesday. 8
University of New Orleans Classes all online on Monday. In person, online, and hybrid classes canceled on Tuesday. 3
Xavier University Classes online after 5 PM Monday. Classes cancelled Tuesday. 8
 
/CFB Ball Mississippi
University Update Sources
Jones County JC Jones College All classes online through Wednesday. 12
Mississippi Gulf Coast CC Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College All classes online starting Monday at noon and Tuesday. 10
Southern Miss University of Southern Mississippi - Gulf Coast Locations All classes and events moved online starting at noon on Monday. 15
 
/CFB Ball South Carolina
If you know of any of these, please let us know.
University Update Sources
 
/CFB Ball North Carolina
If you know of any of these, please let us know.
University Update Sources
 
/CFB Ball Virginia
If you know of any of these, please let us know.
University Update Sources
Sources
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22
 
Touchdown Game Information Penalty Flag
We'll be updating this list as we get information.
This list includes all games played with teams in affected states. Many may not be affected, but given the ripple effects of things like travel and the particular complications of scheduling this season, we've listed them all here for reference.
Date Time Home Team Away Team Game Location
9/18 7:30 PM ET Coastal Carolina Campbell Conway, SC
9/19 12:00 PM ET Georgia State Louisiana Atlanta, GA
9/19 12:00 PM ET Tulane Navy New Orleans, LA
9/19 12:00 PM ET Duke Boston College Durham, NC
9/19 2:30 PM ET Notre Dame USF South Bend, IN
9/19 3:30 PM ET Georgia Tech UCF Atlanta, GA
9/19 3:30 PM ET Georgia Southern FAU Statesboro, GA
9/19 3:30 PM ET UNC Charlotte Chapel Hill, NC
9/19 4:00 PM ET Middle Tennessee Troy Murfreesboro, TN
9/19 4:00 PM ET Clemson The Citadel Clemson, SC
9/19 7:30 PM ET ULM Texas State Monroe, LA
9/19 7:30 PM ET Louisville Miami (FL) Louisville, KY
9/19 7:30 PM ET Southern Miss Louisiana Tech Hattiesburg, MS
9/19 8:00 PM ET NC State Wake Forest Raleigh, NC
 
Learn More
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2020.09.12 23:45 Dry-Teachings [Official//LIVESTREAM]2020 "Tulane vs South Alabama" LiVe StreaMs-rEddIT

[Official//LIVESTREAM]2020 "Tulane vs South Alabama" LiVe StreaMs-rEddIT The NCCAF is back with the Tulane vs South Alabama on Saturday night. Here's how to watch a live stream of the game online for free. See Tulane vs South Alabama NCAA - Live as Stadium vew Stream Live - Free Sports Online Streaming - Date & Time: 12 Sep 2020.
submitted by Dry-Teachings to ncaaflivstreams [link] [comments]


2020.09.12 23:44 Dry-Teachings [OfficialLIVESTREAM]NCAA"Tulane vs South Alabama" liVe STrEaMs-reddit

[OfficialLIVESTREAM]NCAA"Tulane vs South Alabama" liVe STrEaMs-reddit The NCCAF is back with the Tulane vs South Alabama on Saturday night. Here's how to watch a live stream of the game online for free. See Tulane vs South Alabama NCAA - Live as Stadium vew Stream Live - Free Sports Online Streaming - Date & Time: 12 Sep 2020.
submitted by Dry-Teachings to ncaaflivstreams [link] [comments]


2020.09.11 18:52 trifletruffles Jasper Greenwood-his badly decomposed body was found next to his car in Vicksburg, Mississippi in June 1964-Closed Case under the Civil Rights Division Emmett Till Act

On June 29, 1964, the badly decomposed body of Jasper Greenwood was found next to his car on a “lover’s lane,” about 100 yards off of Main Street in Vicksburg, Mississippi. One of the Jasper's family members reported him missing to the Vicksburg Police Department on June 21, 1964. According to a June 30, 1964 article in the Vicksburg Evening Post, no weapon was found near the Jasper's body. Additionally, a purse containing about $61 was found in Jasper's car which likely ruled out the possibility that he was killed during a robbery. As a result of the body’s condition, a coroner’s inquest could not determine the cause of death.
1964 FBI Investigation:
The FBI first opened the matter on June 30, 1964 after receiving a complaint from [name redacted] of the Jackson, Mississippi, Council of Federal Organizations. [Name redacted] told the FBI that Jasper had been found dead in a field on Main Street by two children. According to [name redacted], Jasper had last been seen alive leaving Jasper Lounge (a business he managed) with two white men on June 21, 1964. [Name redacted] noted that Jasper was not active in the civil rights movement or voter registration drives. However, Jasper's [relationship redacted in the closing memorandum] at one time babysat for Medgar Evers’ family. Additionally, on June 30, 1964, [Name Redacted 2] of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) also contacted the FBI and relayed similar information.
On June 30, 1964, Vicksburg Police Department (VPD) Chief Murray Sills informed the FBI that Jasper had been reported missing to the VPD on June 21. Jasper’s body was found at about 3:10 p.m. on June 29 by two boys. Jasper was found lying next to his car; the car was parked on a “lover’s lane” about 100 yards east of Main Street in Vicksburg. Jasper's body was too severely decomposed to allow for an autopsy, and the coroner could not ascertain Jasper's cause of death.
According to Chief Sills, VPD investigators determined that Jasper had last been seen with a married African-American woman sometime between 1:00 and 2:00 a.m. on June 21, 1964. Chief Sills did not identify the woman to the FBI, but presumably knew who she was since he stated that [name redacted] "had been developed as a logical suspect" because [name redacted] had reportedly previously threatened Jasper for dating the woman. Chief Sills stated that both the woman and [name redacted] had disappeared.
On July 4, 1964, Chief Sills contacted the FBI and stated that the VPD had arrested Flossie Lee Minor on July 3. According to Chief Sills, Flossie admitted that she had gone with Jasper to “lover’s lane for a tryst." At some point, Jasper fell to the ground unconscious. When Flossie was not able to resuscitate Jasper, she fled the area. Flossie said that Jasper had apparently died of a heart attack and denied that there had been any foul play.
The FBI was contacted on July 31, 1964, by Dick Corigan, a reporter for the Washington Post, who received information from [name redacted] saying that Jasper's body reportedly had what appeared to be a bullet wound in his chest.The FBI interviewed [name redacted] who was in Vicksburg at the end of June 1964, and heard about Jasper's death. [Name redacted] then visited the Jasper's [relationship redacted]. Jasper's [relationship redacted] told [name redacted] that Jasper had been missing for about a week and had reportedly died of a heart attack. [Relationship redacted] mentioned she had not been allowed to see Jasper's body because it was too decomposed. Jasper's family had not requested an autopsy and "was undecided as to its necessity." When questioned about Jasper's civil rights activities, [relationship redacted] provided no information other than to say that he was a registered voter.
[Name redacted] recalled that a [redacted employee of the funeral home] that prepared Jasper's body for burial arrived at the [relationship redacted]'s residence while [redacted name] was present. According to the redacted employee, while examining Jasper's body, he noticed a hole at the base of Jasper's throat that could have been a stab or bullet wound. When asked whether he had reported the information to the police, the redacted employee said that he thought investigators already had the information and wanted to “keep it quiet;” it was [redacted name]'s understanding that the police report indicated that Jasper died of a heart attack.
[Name redacted] told the FBI that he investigated the matter further and determined that Jasper was not a member of COFO or any related organization and had not been involved in any voter registration drives or other civil rights work. Similarly, Charles Evers, the NAACP’s Mississippi Field Director at the time, informed the FBI that Jasper was not active in voter registration drives or the civil rights movement.
The FBI interviewed the redacted employee of the funeral home [same individual discussed in preceding paragraph]. According to the employee, a coroner’s inquest had been conducted at the site where Jasper's body was found. The employee did not conduct an inquest or examine Jasper's body. He stated that Jasper's body was in terrible condition and had significantly decomposed. The employee did see a hole at the base of Jasper's throat but the hole was full of small worms and he did not think it had been caused by stabbing or a bullet. The employee recalled being questioned by a man he thought was a member of the Greenwood family [Name redacted/same individual discussed in preceding paragraph] when he went to speak with the family about funeral arrangements. According to the employee, when [Name redacted] asked him whether he thought the hole in Jasper's throat had been caused by a bullet, he told [Name redacted] that he had no reason to believe that the hole had been caused by anything other than “nature and the worms.”
2009 Review:
The FBI contacted various acquaintances and members of Jasper's family [all names redacted]. One family member stated Jasper's mother (now deceased) went to look for Jasper when he went missing. She and other family members searched as far as Jackson Road, which Jasper frequently used, but they did not find him. An acquaintance [name redacted] was interviewed by a Mississippi Attorney General’s Office (MAGO) investigator in March 2009. The acquaintance stated that, within hours of Jasper’s body being found, she was interviewed by a Warren County Sheriff’s Department (WCSD) deputy, at her place of employment, the Rockett Cab Company. The deputy told the acquaintance that she had been seen with Jasper that evening. She told the MAGO investigator that she worked the midnight shift at the cab company the entire weekend that Jasper went missing and she did not know why it was rumored that she had been with him at any time.
The FBI conducted an online search for Flossie Minor, who reportedly witnessed Jasper's death, and located a record for a Flossie E. Minor who died on April 2, 2005 in Liberty, Missouri. The FBI obtained a copy of Jasper's death record from James E. Jefferson, Jr., Funeral Director for the W.H. Jefferson Funeral Home. The record stated that Jasper died on June 21, 1964. Jasper's cause of death was listed as “undetermined” with “unknown” contributory causes. The FBI contacted the MAGO and the Mississippi Department of Public Safety, but neither of those agencies had any records relevant to the Jasper's death.
At the conclusion of the FBI's investigation, the Department of Justice concluded that this matter does not constitute a prosecutable violation of the federal criminal civil rights statutes as "neither the FBI’s 1964 nor its 2009 investigation uncovered sufficient evidence to contradict the reported results of the contemporaneous VPD investigation, i.e., that the victim died of a heart attack while in the company of an African-American woman." Accordingly, there is insufficient evidence that "a racially-motivated homicide occurred and, therefore, this matter lacks prosecutive merit and should be closed."
Links:
https://www.justice.gov/crt/case-document/jasper-greenwood-notice-close-file
I came across the Department of Justice’s cold case initiative while reading an article discussing journalists’ efforts to install a billboard on an Arkansas highway aimed at solving the 1954 lynching of Isadore Banks. The Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice launched a website (linked above) to make information about the department’s investigation of cold cases from the Civil Rights Era more accessible to the public. Over the years, the Department “has assisted in prosecuting Edgar Ray Killen in 2005, making him the eighth defendant convicted for the 1964 murders of three civil rights workers in Philadelphia, Mississippi (the "Mississippi Burning" case); secured life sentences in 2003 against the perpetrators of the 1963 Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama; and secured a federal conviction and life sentence of James Ford Seale for the kidnapping and murder of two teenagers in Franklin County, Mississippi in 1964.” Congress recognized the importance of these federal efforts when it enacted the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act in 2008.
Unfortunately, in many cases “legal and evidentiary barriers prevent the Department from moving forward with prosecution." In each case that is not prosecutable, the Department of Justice wrote a closing memo explaining the investigative steps taken and the basis for their conclusion. To date, the Department of Justice has uploaded 115 closing memos. I hope to be able to post on all of the closed cases as I share in the belief with the Department of Justice that “these stories should be told [as] there is value in a public reckoning with the history of racial violence and the complicity of government officials.”
Other posts from the Department of Justice's Cold Case Initiative:
  1. Isadore Banks-unsolved murder in Marion, Arkansas-June 1954
https://www.reddit.com/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/h03esj/isadore_bankslynched_in_marion_arkansas_on_june_8/
  1. Willie Joe Sanford-unsolved murder in Hawkinsville, Georgia-March 1957
https://www.reddit.com/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/h9v61n/willie_joe_sanfordfound_murdered_nea
  1. Ann Thomas-unsolved murder in San Antonio, Texas-April 1969
https://www.reddit.com/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/hdtv4b/ann_thomasfound_murdered_in_san_antonio_texas_on/
  1. Thad Christian-murdered on August 30, 1965 in Central City, Alabama
https://www.reddit.com/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/i4fetd/thad_christianmurdered_on_august_30_1965_in/
  1. Silas Caston-killed on March 1, 1964 by a Hinds County Sheriff’s Office Deputy in Jackson, Mississippi
https://www.reddit.com/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/idx701/silas_castonkilled_on_march_1_1964_by_a_hinds/
  1. Clifford "Clifton" Walker-unsolved murder in Woodville, Mississippi-February 1964
https://www.reddit.com/UnresolvedMysteries/comments/ihkenq/clifford_clifton_walkerfound_murdered_in_his_ca
submitted by trifletruffles to UnresolvedMysteries [link] [comments]


2020.09.09 20:48 mr_tyler_durden Notes and Highlights of Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear’s Live Update September 9, 2020

Notes and Highlights of Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear’s Live Update September 9, 2020
Notes by mr_tyler_durden and Daily Update Team
Register for your Absentee Ballot here!
Watch here:
Headlines
Full Notes
QUESTIONS
(continued in stickied comment)
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2020.09.09 00:25 rayef3rw A Brief Look at How Covid-19 Impacts Current Annual Consecutive Game Streaks

I think the fact that this season will be a college football season like no other goes without saying. This year is a patchwork quilt of teams that are or aren't playing this fall (or something in-between), with many more games likely to be postponed or canceled due to ongoing Covid-19-related fallout.
Perhaps the only close comparison is the 1918 season, where the closing months of WWI sidelined many of the teams that had traditionally played college football, and the Spanish Flu sidelined the rest for varying periods of time.
Looking back through the history of college football, the World Wars (US involvement during 1917-1918 and 1941-1945) have been the two primary disruptors of the traditional yearly meetings between college football teams. I'll do a little more analysis later on in the post, but the vast majority of the existing consecutive game streaks in college football date to post-WWII, with only 27 currently-surviving consecutive match-ups dating to before 1941.
With that introduction, let's take a look at the longest-surviving uninterrupted match-ups in college football and which ones will be impacted this fall. As a quick aside, this of course all depends on how these records get counted going forward and whether a Spring 2020 season (if/when it happens) will be fully counted as the "2020" season, so I'll just add the caveat that these are uninterrupted fall meetings for now -- and assume that applies throughout.
Let me also preface this list by saying that while I tried to include all of the smaller FCS/DII conferences, I would be shocked if I didn't miss a few. If you notice any uninterrupted rivalry games missing from this list, please! -- let me know!
Matchup Current Streak Started Consecutive Years Played Playing Fall 2020? Source(s)
Lafayette Lafayette Lehigh Lehigh 1897 123 NO source
Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin Wisconsin 1907 113 NO source
Clemson Clemson South Carolina South Carolina 1909 111 NO source
NC State NC State Wake Forest Wake Forest 1910 110 YES source
Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma State Oklahoma State 1910 110 YES source
Kansas Kansas Kansas State Kansas State 1911 109 YES source
Iowa State Iowa State Kansas State Kansas State 1917 103 YES source
Michigan Michigan Ohio State Ohio State 1918 102 NO source
Brown Brown Yale Yale 1919 101 NO source
Cornell Cornell Dartmouth Dartmouth 1919 101 NO source
Cornell Cornell Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 1919 101 NO source
North Carolina North Carolina Virginia Virginia 1919 101 YES source
Columbia Columbia Cornell Cornell 1920 100 NO source
Indiana Indiana Purdue Purdue 1920 100 NO source
Duke Duke North Carolina North Carolina 1922 98 YES source
Dartmouth Dartmouth Yale Yale 1925 95 NO source
Georgia Georgia Georgia Tech Georgia Tech 1925 95 NO source
Illinois Illinois Northwestern Northwestern 1927 93 NO source
Navy Navy Notre Dame Notre Dame 1927 93 NO source
Oklahoma Oklahoma Texas Texas 1929 91 YES source
Army Army Navy Navy 1930 90 YES source
Iowa Iowa Minnesota Minnesota 1931 89 NO source
California California UCLA UCLA 1933 87 NO source
Morehouse Morehouse TuskegeeTuskegee 1936 84 NO source1
Southern California USC UCLA UCLA 1936 84 NO source
Colgate Colgate Cornell Cornell 1937 83 NO source
Columbia Columbia Dartmouth Dartmouth 1940 80 NO source
Columbia Columbia Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 1941 79 NO source
Columbia Columbia Yale Yale 1943 77 NO source
Alabama Alabama Mississippi State Mississippi State 1944 76 YES source
Alabama Alabama Tennessee Tennessee 1944 76 YES source
Auburn Auburn Georgia Georgia 1944 76 YES source
Florida Florida Georgia Georgia 1944 76 YES source
Kentucky Kentucky Tennessee Tennessee 1944 76 YES source
LSU LSU Mississippi State Mississippi State 1944 76 YES source
Mississippi State Mississippi State Ole Miss Ole Miss 1944 76 YES source
Richmond Richmond William & Mary William & Mary 1944 76 NO source
Washington Washington Washington State Washington State 1944 76 NO source
Alabama A&M Alabama A&M Alabama State Alabama State 1945 75 NO source
Baylor Baylor TCU TCU 1945 75 YES source
Brown Brown Harvard Harvard 1945 75 NO source
Cincinnati Cincinnati Miami (OH) Miami (OH) 1945 75 NO source
Dartmouth Dartmouth Princeton Princeton 1945 75 NO source
Harvard Harvard Yale Yale 1945 75 NO source
LSU LSU Ole Miss Ole Miss 1945 75 YES source
Miami (OH) Miami (OH) Ohio Ohio 1945 75 NO source
Michigan Michigan Michigan State Michigan State 1945 75 NO source
Oregon Oregon Oregon State Oregon State 1945 75 NO source
Princeton Princeton Yale Yale 1945 75 NO source
Tennessee Tennessee Vanderbilt Vanderbilt 1945 75 YES source
Washington Washington Washington State Washington State 1945 75 NO source
Arizona Arizona Arizona State Arizona State 1946 74 NO source
Brown Brown Princeton Princeton 1946 74 NO source
California California Stanford Stanford 1946 74 NO source
Colorado State Colorado State Wyoming Wyoming 1946 74 NO source
Dartmouth Dartmouth Harvard Harvard 1946 74 NO source
Harvard Harvard Princeton Princeton 1946 74 NO source
Montana Montana Montana State Montana State 1946 74 NO source
New Hampshire New Hampshire Maine Maine 1946 74 NO source
New Mexico New Mexico New Mexico State New Mexico State 1946 74 NO source
North Dakota State North Dakota State South Dakota State South Dakota State 1946 74 NO source
Notre Dame Notre Dame Southern California USC 1946 74 NO source
Sam Houston State Sam Houston State Stephen F. Austin Stephen F. Austin 1946 74 NO source
Southern California USC Stanford Stanford 1946 74 NO source
Albany State Albany State Fort Valley State Fort Valley State 1947 73 NO source
Alabama Alabama Auburn Auburn 1948 72 YES source
Bowling Green Bowling Green Toledo Toledo 1948 72 NO source
Columbia Columbia Harvard Harvard 1948 72 NO source
Cornell Cornell Yale Yale 1949 71 NO source
Cornell Cornell Princeton Princeton 1949 71 NO source
Brown Brown Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 1950 70 NO source
Bucknell Bucknell Lehigh Lehigh 1950 70 NO source
McNeese State McNeese Northwestern State Northwestern State 1951 69 NO source
Columbia Columbia Princeton Princeton 1952 68 NO source
Kentucky Kentucky Vanderbilt Vanderbilt 1953 67 YES source
North Carolina North Carolina NC State NC State 1953 67 YES source
Cornell Cornell Harvard Harvard 1954 66 NO source
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Princeton Princeton 1954 66 NO source
Brown Brown Cornell Cornell 1955 65 NO source
Brown Brown Dartmouth Dartmouth 1955 65 NO source
Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Syracuse Syracuse 1955 65 YES source
Baylor Baylor Texas Tech Texas Tech 1956 64 YES source
Dartmouth Dartmouth Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 1956 64 NO source
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Yale Yale 1956 64 NO source
Harvard Harvard Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 1956 64 NO source
Florida Florida Florida State Florida State 1958 62 NO source
Grambling State Grambling Southern Southern 1958 62 NO source
Jackson State Jackson State Southern Southern 1958 62 NO source
Texas Texas Texas Tech Texas Tech 1960 60 YES source
Alabama Alabama LSU LSU 1964 56 YES source
Georgia Georgia Vanderbilt Vanderbilt 1968 52 YES source
Florida State Florida State Miami Miami 1969 51 YES source
Iowa Iowa Iowa State Iowa State 1970 50 NO source
Ole Miss Ole Miss Vanderbilt Vanderbilt 1970 50 YES source
Virginia Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech 1970 50 YES* source
Air Force Air Force Army Army 1971 49 YES source
Clemson Clemson NC State NC State 1971 49 NO source
Florida Florida LSU LSU 1971 49 YES source
Air Force Air Force Navy Navy 1972 48 YES source
*Game currently postponed
So, what does this all mean? I won't do a full re-hash of the chart, but I'll do some highlights and summaries of the important sections below.
As a side note, I kind of arbitrarily chose to end in 1972, but it has some justification that I'll get to later on. Really, though, it was mostly just because I felt like that was a decent stopping point.

Most Common Causes of Breaks Before Covid

So, what was the primary reason that most these consecutive game streaks last came to an end? And will it be beaten out by Covid, assuming Spring 2020 doesn't count/doesn't happen? I didn't do a fully exhaustive search (partly because some stuff was hard to find and partly because I got tired of looking, if we're being honest), but World War II ended the bulk of the streaks on this list, adding up to about 40 of the matches. The other factors aren't particularly close to matching that total, though World War I is probably the next closest, aside from generic scheduling conflicts/choosing not to schedule each other, with about 5 stoppages.
Other common factors included:
Other less common reasons for breaks that I found amusing included:

Implications

Discontinued Games

The teams and conferences that suffer the most from this are exactly who you'd expect it to be. The Ivy League, Big Ten, and Pac-12 are losing the most uninterrupted games, though the Patriot League, the SWAC, and the MAC are also losing some notable matches
By far the most notable game that will not be played this fall will be the LafayetteLafayette LehighLehigh match-up; it will be the first time in 123 years that the game won't be played in the fall. It was last forgone in 1896 due to a dispute over player eligibility; had it not been for that break in relations, The Rivalry would have dated back wholly uninterrupted to the two teams' first meeting in 1884, which would have been good for 136 consecutive years of playing.
The next oldest game not to be played this fall is the MinnesotaMinnesota WisconsinWisconsin game, followed by the ClemsonClemson South CarolinaSouth Carolina game, which has been played continuously since 1909, meaning the 2020 season will be the end of 3 of the longest-running continuous series in all of college football.
Finally, one game I hate to see go is the MorehouseMorehouse TuskegeeTuskegee match, which had previously been played continuously since 1936. I couldn't find a lot about the history of this series online very easily, but it's the longest-running HBCU match I could find. Several other historic HBCU rivalries ended temporarily fairly recently owing to the disbanding of Prairie View A&MPrairie View A&M for the 1990 football season.

Previously Unbroken Series

Unfortunately, Covid is putting an end to a few series which have previously met every year without interruption. Those matches include:

Non-Conference Games That Were Maintained

You've got to give a lot of credit to any ADs who managed to keep non-conference rivalry games going through all this. The only consecutive non-conference rivalry games that will survive undamaged are those belonging to three major service academies. Unfortunately, the Merchant MarinesMerchant Marine and the Coast GuardCoast Guard were not so fortunate, and have canceled their fall season.
The ArmyArmy, NavyNavy, and Air ForceAir Force managed to keep afloat their rivalries which have been played continuously since 1971/72 for the Air Force and since 1930 for the Army and Navy. This was possible only by the work of the Air Force, who, as of right now, will be playing only Army and Navy this fall, though the Mountain West Conference did recently announce a revised schedule which allows for 2 non-conference games, so this could change. Both ArmyArmy and NavyNavy are currently playing full schedules.
This was really the main reason I stopped making my list in 1972. That, and it lets me talk about the Textile Bowl (NC State vs Clemson). I'll discuss that in the following section.

Games Unlikely to Be Rescheduled

Though most of these games are intra-conference games that can be rescheduled in the Spring fairly easily, there are a few notable games that will almost certainly not be. Many of these games include teams who will both be playing this season, but will be playing in different conferences or unable to meet for other reasons. These games include:

Non-Conference Games Which Can (Probably) Be Rescheduled

While Conference games are possible to be scheduled fairly easily, there are a few non-conference games which will probably be resumed this Spring.

Closing

To answer that question I posed earlier (will Covid potentially impact more currently-consecutive football meetings than World War II), the answer is yes. While this is a bit disingenuous to say, since many otherwise-consecutive rivalry games impacted by World War II have stopped playing since the war for other reasons (looking at you, 2010-14 Conference Realignment), Covid will impact 66 otherwise-uninterrupted matches, while 32 will continue on. Of those 66 canceled matches, though, only the 9 listed above (under the are Unlikely to Be Rescheduled section) are, in my view, highly unlikely to be revived in the Spring, while the rest can continue on in the Spring if scheduling and Corona allow.
1 - I would like to find a more concise and formal source, but so far one has evaded me
2 - Several Minnesota-based athletic pages say that the cause was Teddy Roosevelt banning rivalry games in 1906; despite that, the only period explanation I've found for the break in the games was a June 1906 article about a ChicagoChicago MinnesotaMinnesota game scheduled for 1907, which said the 1906 match-up was prevented because "The big nine conference [Big 10 today], in forbidding games which established a western championship, did so on the ground that it brought about an unhealthy rivalry and stirred up improper spirit between the big educational institutions." Though the Big 9 could have chosen to do that because of threats by Roosevelt, the immediate cause was the conference's decision.
3 - Some sources disagree on this: At the time of their first athletic break, then-AD at BGSU said "Frankly, Toledo is too tough for us in football. We feel that we can no longer compete on even terms." However, there have also been references to players having "more trouble avoiding flying fists than avoiding blockers and tacklers" before the series was temporarily canceled as well. For a good write-up of the series, see here
Thanks to u/bullmoose_atx, u/bwburke94, u/drgnlis, and u/Graduation2017 for the corrections so far
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2020.09.08 05:46 amunoz1804 Online Dating Help

Hey Reddit!
So my name is Jesse, and I was hoping some of y'all could give me some friendly advice :)
So I'm a dude in college and if being fully honest, I've been pretty lonely lately. It's been a long while since I've been in a relationship, and I've been low-key wanting something actually real. For the past month or so, I tried getting back into online dating, but I've been anything but lucky. I've talked to several girls but most, if not all, ghosted me after the first few messages and I never heard back from any of them. I've been mostly on Tinder and Bumble, but I've had no luck from either.
Here's the thing though. I haven't selected to be shown to guys as well because I'm kinda scared to be outed among the people that know me but don't necessarily know my sexuality. So far, I've only let me close friends know I'm bi, and I've learned the hard way what can happen when you're too open about it and people start putting labels on you that you didn't ask for (I'm sure y'all can relate). Anyway, I've read in several places that being open about it online and putting Bisexual in your profile can sort of act like a filter so that you're only talking to people worth your time, but I won't lie it's kind of scary to me. I'd be more willing if I lived somewhere more progressive, but I'm in Birmingham, Alabama! Not the ideal place for it lol.
If you guys could give me some advice on what I should do it if you have any personal experiences that maybe be helpful, I'd really really appreciate it. I don't usually post on reddit so this is how I know I'm kinda desperate for answers tee-hee :)
submitted by amunoz1804 to bibros [link] [comments]


2020.09.08 05:45 amunoz1804 Online Dating Help

Hey Reddit!
So my name is Jesse, and I was hoping some of y'all could give me some friendly advice :)
So I'm a dude in college and if being fully honest, I've been pretty lonely lately. It's been a long while since I've been in a relationship, and I've been low-key wanting something actually real. For the past month or so, I tried getting back into online dating, but I've been anything but lucky. I've talked to several girls but most, if not all, ghosted me after the first few messages and I never heard back from any of them. I've been mostly on Tinder and Bumble, but I've had no luck from either.
Here's the thing though. I haven't selected to be shown to guys as well because I'm kinda scared to be outed among the people that know me but don't necessarily know my sexuality. So far, I've only let me close friends know I'm bi, and I've learned the hard way what can happen when you're too open about it and people start putting labels on you that you didn't ask for (I'm sure y'all can relate). Anyway, I've read in several places that being open about it online and putting Bisexual in your profile can sort of act like a filter so that you're only talking to people worth your time, but I won't lie it's kind of scary to me. I'd be more willing if I lived somewhere more progressive, but I'm in Birmingham, Alabama! Not the ideal place for it lol.
If you guys could give me some advice on what I should do it if you have any personal experiences that maybe be helpful, I'd really really appreciate it. I don't usually post on reddit so this is how I know I'm kinda desperate for answers tee-hee :)
submitted by amunoz1804 to bisexual [link] [comments]


2020.09.07 17:35 Thisisscilla Looking to talk about everything under the sun!

32/F/NorthAlabama. I'm looking to make new friends, either by way of chatting online or in person too. I love art (painting is my specialty), reading good stories and also writing them, animals (I have a mini farm in my apartment), nature, and eating delicious food! I'm married to a wonderful woman, and am wanting platonic friendships only, preferably women but doesn't have to be at all, and if you are part of a couple and like to go on double dates, that's even better, we would love to get to know you! If not part of a couple we could still have a good time all the same. But yeah, message me if you're bored and want to talk about just about anything.
submitted by Thisisscilla to MakeFriendsOver30 [link] [comments]


Driving Downtown - Birmingham Alabama USA - YouTube LOGAN PAUL ONLINE DATING IN ROBLOX! *Gone Wrong* - YouTube Online Dating Guide For Women (How to Land a Quality Man ... 30 vs 1: Dating App in Real Life  Versus 1 - YouTube A Day In The Life...Booger's Way  The Cowboy Way - YouTube Top 3 Most Online Dating Games on Roblox! - YouTube Top 10 Scary Online Dating Stories - Part 2 - YouTube The paradox of choice — how dating apps are ruining dating ... Lynyrd Skynyrd - Sweet Home Alabama - YouTube Dating 101: Talking To Guys Online Vs. Real Life w/Matthew ...

Dating Alabama

  1. Driving Downtown - Birmingham Alabama USA - YouTube
  2. LOGAN PAUL ONLINE DATING IN ROBLOX! *Gone Wrong* - YouTube
  3. Online Dating Guide For Women (How to Land a Quality Man ...
  4. 30 vs 1: Dating App in Real Life Versus 1 - YouTube
  5. A Day In The Life...Booger's Way The Cowboy Way - YouTube
  6. Top 3 Most Online Dating Games on Roblox! - YouTube
  7. Top 10 Scary Online Dating Stories - Part 2 - YouTube
  8. The paradox of choice — how dating apps are ruining dating ...
  9. Lynyrd Skynyrd - Sweet Home Alabama - YouTube
  10. Dating 101: Talking To Guys Online Vs. Real Life w/Matthew ...

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